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In particular, achieving the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals will depend on India’s efforts to decarbonize and to mitigate climate change. The G20 Presidency theme, “Vasudhaiva Kutumbakam,” or “One Earth, One Family, One Future,” is an unmistakable indication of India’s aspiration to play its part. The Indian government has pledged to achieve energy independence by 2047 and a net-zero economy by 2070.

By the middle of this century, India is expected to have one of the largest economies and 20% of the world’s population. Consequently, there is no denying that India’s decisions will increasingly affect the entire world.

In particular, achieving the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals will depend on India’s efforts to decarbonize and to mitigate climate change.

The G20 Presidency theme, “Vasudhaiva Kutumbakam,” or “One Earth, One Family, One Future,” is an unmistakable indication of India’s aspiration to play its part. The Indian government has pledged to achieve energy independence by 2047 and a net-zero economy by 2070.

Given India’s current economic standing, the country may have an advantage. India, on the other hand, has the potential to shape, develop, build, and reach for the stars, while the developed world’s climate efforts must centre on repairing a deeply ingrained energy landscape.

Recent crises highlight the need to incorporate the net-zero goal into existing development models and use all of India’s available resources to get there as quickly as possible. When energy models are overly reliant on carbon-dense energy sources provided by a small number of suppliers, as was the case in 2022, geopolitical unrest and some of the worst climate-related disasters on record expose the fragility of societies and economies.

In this case, what steps should India take?

One of the most important aspects of the story is the transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources like solar and wind power. While renewables may get the most attention in the media and policy discussions, the energy transition is about much more than just those sources.

To enable significantly more efficient and effective energy management for all.

That, in turn, requires implementing digital technologies that track energy consumption in commercial and residential buildings, utilities, and other industrial settings. Through the use of software, AI, and data analytics, we are able to regulate and fine-tune our consumption patterns to save resources and cut costs while simultaneously reducing our carbon footprint.

Alternately, we could electrify our means of transportation, heating our homes, and preparing our meals to achieve the same or greater efficiency. That means replacing gas and wood heating systems with electric heat pumps and switching from internal combustion engines to cleaner, more efficient electric alternatives in cars and public transportation.

It also necessitates encouraging more Indians to use decentralised energy sources like solar panels on homes’ roofs and microgrids. These make it possible for homes and businesses to generate and store their own clean electricity, making them less reliant on the utility company’s power grid.

Hydrogen from renewable sources will play an ancillary role, facilitating the storage of renewable energy and aiding in the decarbonization of more difficult-to-abate industries like aviation, chemistry, and steel.

It may seem like a pipe dream to think about providing India’s 1.4 billion people with access to safe, clean, and reliable energy by constructing an entirely new energy model. In my opinion, it is not only possible, but imminent. In addition, this is a chance for India to showcase and fortify its leadership in digital adoption, sustainability action, and human capital development as it strives for its Amrit Kaal.

There are, after all, already available technological means to do so. All that remains is to rapidly implement them on a massive scale and fully commit to the idea that from this point forward, all new construction must be carbon neutral.

Taking this step will improve India’s access to and safety with its energy supply. It’s goal is to combat global warming. And it will aid in ensuring a long-term future for all of humanity, not just India.

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